$410,000 awarded to 22 Native youth programs, including Pyramid Lake | FirstNationsFocus.com

$410,000 awarded to 22 Native youth programs, including Pyramid Lake

First Nation's Focus

Alizah Lara and Rylen Patrick lead the Owl Dance during the 2017 camp at the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation.

NIXON, Nev. — The First Nations Development Institute (FNDI) in September announced the selection of 22 American Indian organizations and tribes to receive grants through its Native Youth and Culture Fund for the 2017-18 funding cycle. The grants total $410,000.

The fund, launched in 2002, is designed to enhance culture and language awareness, and promote youth empowerment, leadership and community building. To date under this fund, FNDI has awarded 351 grants to Native youth programs throughout the U.S., totaling $5.96 million.

Among the tribes to receive funds this year is the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe in Nixon, Nevada. According to FNDI, $20,000 will be donated for the 2017-18 grant cycle to the tribe's Summer Cultural Day Camp and associated activities.

"(The 2018 camp) will teach children their Northern Paiute culture and heritage through language immersion, traditional dances, oral history and the making of traditional Paiute beadwork," according to an FNDI news release. "Elders and community members will share their knowledge in both hands-on and classroom settings."

According to a previous story in First Nation's Focus, more than 90 students from the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Reservation performed songs and dances they learned during the four-week long camp this July in Nixon.

“Through our summer program we have acknowledged the importance of preserving our culture and really looking at our language,” said Karen Shaw, Washoe County School District fifth-grade teacher, in the August 2017 story. “When we look within the reservation, we have less than 50 fluent speakers left. Our hopes are to do all we can to preserve our language and culture, because our language is the basis of everything.”

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According to that story, the 2017 camp also benefited from a $20,000 grant from FNDI. Visit http://plpt.nsn.us to learn more about the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

 

Other grants

Below is a list of other tribes that will receive funding as part of the 2017-18 grant cycle from FNDI:

  • California Indian Museum & Cultural Center, Santa Rosa (CA), $20,000
  • Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, Odanah (WI), $18,200
  • Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe, Hollister (NC), $20,000
  • Hoopa Valley Tribe, Hoopa (CA), $20,000
  • Iḷisaġvik College, Barrow (AK), $20,000
  • Lakota Cultural Center, Eagle Butte (SD), $20,000
  • Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, Cass Lake (MN), $20,000
  • Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Harbor Springs (MI), $18,300
  • Medicine Lodge Confederacy, Garrison, (ND), $20,000
  • Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains, Eagle Butte (SD), $20,000
  • Navajo Studies Conference, Inc., Albuquerque (NM), $20,000
  • Ogallala Commons, Inc., Nazareth (TX), $14,000
  • Osage Nation, Pawhuska (OK), $19,800
  • Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa, Tama (IA), $16,600
  • Santa Fe Indian School, Santa Fe (NM), $20,000
  • Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Suquamish, (WA), $19,800
  • TC Roughriders 4-H Club, Walthill, (NE), $20,000
  • White Mountain Apache Tribe – Water Resources, Ndee Bikiyaa, The People’s Farm, Fort Apache, (AZ), $20,000
  • Woodland Boys & Girls Club, Neopit, (WI), $20,000
  • World Indigenous Nations University, Hula (HI), $20,000

 

About First Nations Development Institute

For 37 years, using a three-pronged strategy of educating grassroots practitioners, advocating for systemic change, and capitalizing Indian communities, FNDI has been working to restore Native American control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native American communities.

FNDI serves Native American communities throughout the United States. For more information, visit http://www.firstnations.org.