Reno art display from Jack Malotte (Shoshone, Washoe) gets $10K grant | FirstNationsFocus.com

Reno art display from Jack Malotte (Shoshone, Washoe) gets $10K grant

First Nation’s Focus

Native American artist Jack Malotte works in his studio in Duckwater, Nev., on Monday, March 27, 2017. Photo by Cathleen Allison/Nevada Photo Source

RENO, Nev. — The National Endowment for the Arts announced in February it has awarded grants totaling $90,000 to support several projects planned in fiscal year 2019, including a much-anticipated display this summer at the Nevada Museum of Art from visual artist Jack Malotte, an enrolled member of the South Fork Band of the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone.

"We are thrilled that the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded direct grants to these Nevada arts institutions and municipalities," said Tony Manfredi, executive director of the Nevada Arts Council. "These awards will allow thousands of Nevadans to experience the excellence in the arts that our cultural institutions have to offer."

Grant recipients Nevada include: $10,000 to the Neon Museum in Las Vegas; $10,000 to UNLV; $10,000 to the Carson City Arts Initiative; $10,000 to Artown Reno; $30,000 to the city of Reno; $10,000 to the Sierra Nevada Ballet; and $10,000 to the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno.

The latter grant will help fund various aspects of Malotte's display "Sagebrush Heathen: The Art of Jack Malotte," planned June 8 to Oct. 20 in the museum's Robert Z. Hawkins Gallery.

According to the Nevada Museum of Art, Malotte makes artworks that celebrate the landscapes of the Great Basin, with a unique focus on contemporary political issues faced by Native people seeking to protect and preserve access to their lands.

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Malotte's most recent work reconsiders historical narratives and myths of the American West; refers to Western Shoshone and Washoe traditions and legends; and highlights longtime political, environmental, and legal struggles of Native communities.

Born in Reno, Malotte was raised on the Walker River Indian Reservation and attended Wooster High School. At the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, California (1971-74), he was influenced by the work of Arthur Okamura, Jack Mendenhall, and Chuck Close.

Malotte also worked as a U.S. Forest Service Firefighter. Malotte, who is Western Shoshone and Washoe, currently resides in Duckwater, a rural community located in central Nevada.

In all, the NEA's grants for fiscal year 2019 total $27 million and reach all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Go to http://www.arts.gov to learn more about the National Endowment for the Arts; and go to nvculture.org/nevadaartscouncil to learn more about the Nevada Arts Council.

Learn more

Go here to learn more about “Sagebrush Heathen: The Art of Jack Malotte,” planned for June 8 to Oct. 20 at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno.